Human evolution theory utilizing concepts of neoteny & female sexual selection
An etiology of neuropsychological disorders such as autism and dyslexia, and the origin of left handedness.

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Doug Jones

Sexual selection, physical attractiveness, and facial neoteny: cross-cultural evidence and implications: Bibliographical Excerpts


"The evolution of modern Homo sapiens over the past 100,000 years has been marked by a trend toward increasingly craniofacial neoteny, including reduced prognathism, increased brachycephaly, and general gracilization in a number of populations. (Weidenreich 1945, Newman 1962, Brace and Mahler 1971, Frayer 1981). Biological anthropologists have generally invoked natural selection for ecological adaptation of nonadaptive forces such as pleiotropy or biased mutation to explain these trends. The analysis in this paper suggests that sexual selection may also be involved." (Jones, Doug (1995) Sexual selection, physical attractiveness, and facial neoteny: cross-cultural evidence and implications. Current Anthropology 36 (5): pp. 735)

[quote from Gowaty, 1992, p. 231-240] "Juvenilization decreases the threat some men may feel when confronted with women; many men are comfortable around women whom they can clearly dominate and are profoundly uncomfortable around women whom they cannot so clearly dominant. The hypothesis that femininity signals ability to be dominated through juvenilization is an alternative to, but not necessarily mutually exclusive of, other evolutionary hypotheses that posit that femininity signals, sometimes deceptively, reproductive value and fertility." (Jones, Doug (1995) Sexual selection, physical attractiveness, and facial neoteny: cross-cultural evidence and implications. Current Anthropology 36 (5): pp. 727)

"In other words, given that attractiveness varies with age, individuals may be more or less attractive than others of the same age in part because they have facial proportions associated with younger or older ages. Because the retention of traits from early stages of the life cycle into later stages, relative to ancestors or to other members of the population, is known as neoteny ("holding on to youth"), the proposition above may be rephrased: given that attractiveness varies with age, neoteny may be a component of facial attractiveness. This proposition may hold with particular force for female facial attractiveness: a by-product of the human male's attraction to markers of youthful fecundity may be an attraction to adult females presenting markers of youth to an exaggerated or "supernormal" degree." (Jones, Doug (1995) Sexual selection, physical attractiveness, and facial neoteny: cross-cultural evidence and implications. Current Anthropology 36 (5): pp. 728)

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